TF2: tl;dr

Be a decent TF2 player

Outcomes

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“Thorough preparation must lead to success. Neglect nothing.” — Sir Arthur Currie

“No battle plan survives contact with the enemy.” — Helmuth von Moltke the Elder

Certainly the latter sounds more pragmatic, so should you and your team just connect to a server and wing it? Of course not, and a lot of people don’t, but a lot of people are also less prepared than they think they are.

The operative word is “plan” and while similar, is not the same as “strategy,” yet it’s common to equate the two. A plan amounts to something like an approximate timeline for your victory. Put players here, here, and here, and we will destroy the other team and cap out.

Meanwhile, a strategy goes beyond that, and asks some pretty tough questions. What if that “plan” doesn’t work out? Do you have a way to escape and take defensive measures (commonly a “plan B”)? How do you even know that you are on the losing end before it’s too late?

A plan ultimately does not survive contact with the enemy because it’s more long term than the combat itself, but is not so long that it can outlast defeat. A strategy is a much more thorough understanding of outcomes, and how to deal with those outcomes.

I have fallen into this trap, having come from a much faster paced game. In TFC, it was more than sufficient to just agree on positions for defense, and general routes for offense. If you died, so what? You respawned a second later and could bunny-hop, conc jump, or grenade jump to where you had to be in a few more.

You can’t do that in TF2. Being killed carries a stiffer penalty compared to TFC, like being the trigger for the loss of the rest of the team, or the loss of the map. Where it used to be only demomen that needed some sense of self-preservation, and only on defense, now everybody has to be aware of the consequences of the respawn timer.

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Written by Chatterbox

November 2, 2008 at 12:06 am

Posted in perspective

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